Birago diop s vanity

Details of the Poem, Vanity by Birago Diop

If we tell, gently, gently All that we shall one day have to tell, Who then will hear our voices without laughter, Sad complaining voices of beggars Who indeed will hear them without laughter.

Turmoil, political chaos and mismanagement everywhere. A figure of speech that entails using a part to represent a whole or a whole for a part. Although the tales served as entertainment, they also had the greater purpose of teaching younger generations about the beliefs and values of their ancestors.

Details of the Poem, Vanity by Birago Diop

Mood and Tone The mood is that of worry with a corresponding tone of concern, condemnation, sarcasm and ridicule. What eyes will watch our large mouth. Indirectly, the poetic persona is saying that no emotional person will pity Africans because, they are the cause of their problem having, ignored the advice of their ancestors.

The rich are getting richer and the poor poorer; no sense of value for the beauty in African way of life. These ceremonies commonly consisted of songs and dances in addition to these folktales. When the greens of summer and the russets of autumn have passed, I seek the vast expanses of the Savannah, and find only bare mountains, sombre as ancient prostrate giants that the snow refuses to bury because of their misdeed Like the popular myth in many African societies about dead ancestors, Diop believes that they are immortal and at death, they take up another important role of watching over the living and saving them from unseen forces.

This figure of speech involves the attribution of human nature or character to animals, inanimate objects, or abstract notions. In the third stanza, the poet talks about the clamour which is yet to be addressed. Unless we return home, things will remain the same and will soon get worse, prophesizes the poetic persona.

The poet also repeats some phrases and images for emphasis. In Vanity, the poet gives life to dead ancestors through the use of personification.

They have ignored the advice of their forebears, rejected their ancestral ways and embraced the tradition of the western world at the expense of African culture.

The theme of irreversibility: When our Dead comes with their Dead When they have spoken to us in their clumsy voices; Just as our ears were deaf To their cries, to their wild appeals Just as our ears were deaf They have left on the earth their cries, In the air, on the water, where they have traced their signs for us blind deaf and unworthy Sons Who see nothing of what they have made In the air, on the water, where they have traced their signs And since we did not understand the dead Since we have never listened to their cries If we weep, gently, gently If we cry roughly to our torments What heart will listen to our clamoring, What ear to our sobbing hearts.

What ear to our pitiful anger Which grows in us like a tumor In the black depth of our plaintive throats. Both poems are of multiple stanzas, both poems are in free verse, both poems are fortified with imageries sight and soundboth poems carry symbolisms among other similarities.

He laments as follows: Like the popular myth in many African societies about dead ancestors, Diop believes that they are immortal and at death, they take up another important role of watching over the living and saving them from unseen forces.

The setting of the poem seems communal truly really humanlike. Stanza 2 Here, the poetic persona laments that if the prevailing negative condition of Africans get worst, he wonders who will look at us as we open our mouth widely to cry and plead for help.

A figure of speech that entails using a part to represent a whole or a whole for a part. The poem presupposes the notion that Africa is already impoverished, and is swimming in a state of squalor, hence, the poetic persona metaphorically compares them with beggars.

What ear to our pitiful anger Which grows in us like a tumor In the black depth of our plaintive throats.

(1) The theme of African cultural decadence.

He expresses his worry through a number of rhetorical questions. In the fourth stanza, the poet envisages the future when the elites die our dead and come face to face with their ancestors their dead in the spirit world.

What ear to our pitiful anger Which grows in us like a tumor In the black depth of our plaintive throats. If we tell, gently, gently All that we shall one day have to tell, Who then will hear our voices without laughter, Sad complaining voices of beggars Who indeed will hear them without laughter.

When we — the Africans — cry for help, no heart or ear will pay attention to us. Upon accepting this position, he claimed to have "broken his pen," suggesting that he was ready to give up writing altogether and focus on his diplomatic career.

Birago Diop

The last stanza ends on a pessimistic note. Diop put his message across to readers through clamouring and admonition with a pessimistic mood while Okara tabled his own message via comparison by comparing his simple past African background to his complex present European lifestyle.

Vanity by Birago Diop

This is mocking humour. Analysis of the poem "vanity" by Birago Diop. Akinyele Ebenezer jamb, poem 1 comment Complete analysis of the poem "Vanity" by Biragol Diop If we tell, gently, gently All that we shall one day have to tell, Birago Diop argues that the solution to Africa’s many problems lie within us.

Jul 07,  · The title, “Vanity”, literary means having immense interest in one’s appearance, achievement or material things. But, as the title of this poem, it figuratively refers to Africans’ penchant attitude towards material things often imported from the western world at the expense of African culture, value and identity.

Let’s now focus on the themes of Vanity by Birago Diop. (1) The theme of African cultural decadence. The message of the poet shows that African are no longer following the valuable paths of their ancestral living which happens to be the only way African culture can remain intact.

Vanity by Birago Diop exposes the negative effects of the acculturation of some West African countries through the French policy of assimilation during the colonial period. Assimilation was a major policy of French colonial administration in the 19 th – 20 th century in West Africa.

Vanity by Birago Diop. Vanity. If we tell, gently, gently. All that we shall one day have to tell, Who then will hear our voices without laughter, Sad complaining voices of beggars.

Birago Diop argues that the solution to Africa’s many problems lie within us. Birago Diop argues that the solution to Africa’s many problems lie within us.

African poetry, Vanity by Birago Diop; Book Reviews, Read More. 73 Comments oakley sunglasses November 1, at pm Reply. Saved as a favorite, І like your web site! yusuf rafiu November 12, at am Reply.

Birago diop s vanity
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